Tom Schwab, 37, proposes to his girlfriend of 18 months, Mary Nubla, 35, in Times Square on February 14, 2014 in New York City. (She said yes.)
Andrew Burton—Getty Images
By Jackie Zimmermann
February 12, 2015

In a building with sweeping views of New York’s Hudson River, pictures of a couple hang from “cherry blossom trees” that were handmade for the occasion from branches and petals. A harpist strums softly in the background as a woman makes her way down an aisle of rose petals towards a table with an elaborate ice sculpture. Petals spell her name on the floor.

Her family and friends are there too, waiting on another floor to celebrate with a catered dinner followed by a night of dancing.

This isn’t a wedding; it is a real-life marriage proposal event. And it cost $43,000.

These days, the traditional “will you marry me?” move—that is, a groom-to-be down on one knee in a restaurant or other romantic location—simply doesn’t cut it for many couples. “Everyone is trying to make their proposal unique,” says Michele Velazquez, co-founder of The Heart Bandits, a proposal and romantic event planning service that arranged the event in New York. “You don’t want to have your girlfriend Google a proposal and see that it’s been done a bunch of times.”

While $43,000 is an extreme example (the average wedding costs $30,000), Velazquez says the typical proposal planned by her firm ranges from $3,000 and $5,000. That’s still a hefty sum, especially when you consider that the proposer also has to buy a ring—$5,600 on average, according to a 2013 survey of grooms by The Knot.

Despite those costs, The Heart Bandits have never suffered from a lack of demand. Velazquez says her business has grown 100% every year since it launched in 2010.

Looking for a really phenomenal way to pop the question? Below you’ll find costs for other over-the-top-proposals.

But keep in mind the top tip that Velazquez offers her clients: “It’s not about the money you spend, it’s about the personalization.” In other words, look for a way that reflects something about your relationship or your future spouse’s interests.

What it Costs to Propose With…

A hot-air balloon: About $200 to $400 per person for a 60-minute private ride

The jumbotron at an MLB game: $50 to $2,500, based on data compiled by Swimmingly.com

A skywriter: $1,500 to $2,000, according to nationwide aerial advertising firm FlySigns

An airplane banner: Starting around $500, according to nationwide aerial advertising firm FlySigns

Musicians:$150 to $300 per hour for a soloist hired via a website like gigmasters.com

A glass slipper at Walt Disney World: $375 on top of the cost of admission. Other Disney proposal events and locations range from $15 (“Will You Marry Me?” chocolate slipper dessert) to $500+ (Fireworks boat cruise on private yacht)

Fireworks: $2,500 to $6,000, according to pyrotech.com

A flash mob: upwards of $2,000, as reported by The New York Times

A mock movie trailer: can be around $5,000, according to Drywater Productions in Janesville, Wisc., but the price varies based on video specifics

A professional photographer or videographer: $25 to more than $1,000

 

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