Robert A. Di Ieso, Jr.
By Sarah Max
March 20, 2015

Q: I downloaded the app from Personal Capital to get a better look at my finances. Is it worth the money to use their advisory service? I had a free discussion with one of their advisers and liked what they had to say, but I have a complex portfolio inherited from my parents. — Dan in Gillette, Wyo.

A: Over the last several years a new breed of technology-based financial advisory services — sometimes referred to as robo-advisers — have come on the scene in an attempt to serve investors who otherwise wouldn’t seek or couldn’t afford professional advice. Many investors don’t meet the minimum required by traditional advisers, while others are, understandably, reluctant to pay the typical 1% management fee for hands-on financial advice.

Enter the likes of Personal Capital, Wealthfront, Betterment and other services that help investors allocate, invest, monitor and rebalance their assets.

Personal Capital offers a free app that aggregates financial information on a single dashboard, and in turn uses that information to call on clients who may benefit from their advisory service, which melds technology with traditional human advice; clients and advisers communicate via phone, text, instant message and Skype.

Here’s the catch: At 0.89% for the first $1 million, the fee for Personal Capital is nearly as high as what you’d pay for a traditional advisory relationship.

“Is it worth it? We think there are several other options available that may be a better fit,” says Mel Lindauer, co-author of “The Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing” (Wiley) and a founder of the Bogleheads Forum, which focuses on low-cost, do-it-yourself investing à la Vanguard Group founder Jack Bogle.

If you’re primarily interested in help with asset allocation, he says, there are more affordable services worth checking out. Vanguard Personal Advisor Services, for example, charges 0.3% for its service. On a $1 million portfolio, that’s the difference between $8,900 a year and $3,000 a year, says Lindauer. An even cheaper option yet: target date funds, which peg their portfolios to investors’ retirement date.

Of course, asset allocation is only one piece of the financial puzzle. A good adviser can help you with everything from budgeting and taxes to estate planning.

Personal Capital advisors do work with clients on broader issues, but if your situation is truly complex, you may be better served sitting down with a traditional fee-only adviser.

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