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By Bob Sullivan / Credit.com
May 24, 2016

Can a debt collector contact family, friends, or co-workers in an attempt to find you?

Yes, yes, and yes. But she or he can’t say very much.

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act offers consumers a wide set of protections about how collectors can go about their business. But it doesn’t prevent them from contacting whoever they want while looking for you.

There are very strict rules about what they can say, however. The law says collectors can only ask about a debtor’s “location information,” meaning their “place of abode and … telephone number at such place, or … place of employment.”

What Can a Collector Say?

Critically, collectors are not allowed to share any information about the debt with these third parties. Collectors do have to identify their employer if asked, which probably tips off neighbors or relatives that the debtor has money trouble. But otherwise, collectors cannot reveal anything about the debt. Generally, they can’t even leave voicemails requesting callbacks.

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The law also only gives collectors one bite of that apple. They can’t call friends, neighbors or co-workers more than once, unless they have some reason to believe there is new information to be gleaned.

Read More: Understanding Your Debt Collection Rights

Here’s what the law says:

“(A collector can not) communicate with any such person more than once unless requested to do so by such person or unless the debt collector reasonably believes that the earlier response of such person is erroneous or incomplete and that such person now has correct or complete location information.”

A bunch of other rules further limit who debt collectors can contact and how. If a collector knows a debtor can’t take personal calls at work, the collector can’t call their workplace, for example.

And most importantly, once a debtor tells a collector to stop calling third parties, or stop calling the office, those calls must stop. Their only legitimate reason to contact a third party is if collectors have no way to contact the debtor, so a request to stop third parties eliminates the grounds for contacting them.

Also, if a debtor is being represented by an attorney, the collector must contact that attorney instead of the debtor or any third party.

While the law is pretty clear on what is and isn’t permitted, there are ample opportunities for abuse. Collectors who reach family members or friends may hint — or directly express — threats aimed at the debtor. They may even request or demand payment. Those activities are illegal, but it’s easy to see how they can happen.

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“If you don’t want your friend to get in serious trouble with the law, make sure you deliver this message,” for example.

A Different Kind of Block Party

Collectors who repeatedly use these tactics with multiple neighbors are conducting what’s known as a “block party.” It’s illegal, and victims can sue collectors for sizable damages when a block party is conducted. A similar tactic, when used to call a debtor’s workplace, is sometimes called an “office party.” That’s also illegal.

Third parties who believe they have been harassed – if stop contact requests aren’t honored, or if they are contacted at inconvenient times – can potentially have their own cause of action against collectors, in addition to potential legal action by the debtor.

Read More: The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act

The Federal Trade Commission makes the full text of the Fair Debt Collections Practices Act available in brochure form on its website.

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