Honda has recalled more than 300,000 vehicles due to defective airbags.
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images
By Kerry Close
June 30, 2016

If you drive an older Honda car or SUV, your vehicle may have been recalled today.

In an unusually urgent warning, both the U.S. government and Honda are telling owners of certain older Honda cars and SUVs to stop driving them and immediately have them repaired, USA Today reported. That’s because their defective airbags, from Japanese auto supplier Takata, are making them dangerous to drive. Takata is already the subject of the largest recall in history.

The affected cars this round cover about 313,000 vehicles from model years 2001 to 2003. The cars are as follows:

  • 2001 to 2002 Honda Civic
  • 2001 to 2002 Honda Accord
  • 2002 to 2003 Acura TL
  • 2002 Honda CRV
  • 2002 Honda Odyssey
  • 2003 Pilot
  • 2003 Acura CL

“We want to get them off the road,” Honda spokesman Marcos Frommer told USA Today. “We want them to drive them right to the dealer and get them repaired.”

The airbag inflators contain a manufacturing defect that greatly increases their potential for dangerous rupture, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. New testing data revealed airbag rupture rates as high as 50%, and that ruptures are more likely to occur in vehicles that spend long periods of time in areas of high humidity, like Florida and Texas.

This isn’t the first time this year that more Takata products were found to be defective. In February, Takata’s massive-scale recall became even larger, when an additional 70 to 90 million airbag inflators used by major automakers like Honda, Ford and Chrysler were recalled.

The good news is that the vehicles with inflators most likely to rupture have already been repaired. That includes about 70% of the most critical vehicles, many of which were already recalled between 2008 and 2011. Still, hundreds of thousands of vehicles still need to be brought in, including those belonging to owners from 2008 to 2011 who did not return their vehicles for repair during previous recalls.

Read More: New Cars Are Still Being Sold With Defective Takata Airbags

Honda says it’s aggressively pursuing drivers of affected cars, starting with send them mail and texts, and in some cases, going so far as to hire private detectives to find the missing cars and their owners. Honda’s general manager says its efforts have pushed the brand ahead of its competitors in terms of repairing vehicles affected by the recall.

If you think you may be driving an affected vehicle, you should immediately visit www.SaferCar.gov to see if your car has any outstanding safety recalls. If your car is affected, contact your nearest dealership to schedule a repair at no cost.

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