Chicago Cubs celebrate winning the NLCS, and will face the Cleveland Indians in the 2016 World Series.
Robin Alam/Icon Sportswire—Getty Images
By Brad Tuttle
October 24, 2016

We warned you last week that World Series tickets would be off-the-charts expensive if the Chicago Cubs won the National League Championship Series to face the Cleveland Indians for the league title. And now we know just how crazy the market for Cubs’ World Series tickets could get.

According to the ticket resale and research site TicketIQ, the average list price for the three games at Chicago’s Wrigley Field is a totally bonkers $6,048. That’s roughly the average price of seats for the last two Super Bowls. Only with the Super Bowl, there is a single game to be played, while the World Series is, well, a series that potentially goes seven games.

TicketIQ data shows that the average list price for the Indians’ four home games at Progressive Field is $3,286. This too is crazy, even though it’s roughly half the typical asking price for Cubs’ World Series home games.

Mind you, the prices above are asking prices. They’re not necessarily what fans have been paying for World Series tickets in actual purchasing transactions. Still, in terms of sales prices, tickets at Wrigley are more than double the cost of those at Progressive: The average seat on the secondary market has been selling for $3,870 for games in Chicago, versus $1,640 for games in Cleveland.

Read Next: The Funniest World Series Bets Made by Famous Baseball Fans

Another point worth noting is that the average purchase price may be significantly more than the cheapest seats in the house. At resale sites like StubHub and Vivid Seats, as of Monday prices start at around $700 for seats to Cleveland’s first two home games in the series.

However, even the “cheap seats” at Wrigley are insane, starting at a low of around $2,000 and going much, much higher than that. It’ll be interesting to see how World Series ticket prices fluctuate as the matchup progresses and it looks like one of these historically title-deprived teams will actually win it all.

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