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By Aaron Brown / The Drive
February 3, 2017
The Jaguar and Land Rover company logos sit on a sign at the entrance to Tata Motors Ltd.'s Jaguar Land Rover vehicle manufacturing plant in Solihull, U.K., on Wednesday, July, 15, 2015. Jaguar Land Rover, the U.K. luxury-car unit of Tata Motors Ltd., cut its sales targets and prices in China amid slowing demand in the world’s largest auto market. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg
The Jaguar and Land Rover company logos sit on a sign at the entrance to Tata Motors Ltd.'s Jaguar Land Rover vehicle manufacturing plant in Solihull, U.K., on Wednesday, July, 15, 2015. Jaguar Land Rover, the U.K. luxury-car unit of Tata Motors Ltd., cut its sales targets and prices in China amid slowing demand in the world’s largest auto market. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg
Chris Ratcliffe—Bloomberg via Getty Images

Criminals stole more than $3.75 million worth of engines from Jaguar Land Rover’s factory in Solihull, England in a daring, six-minute heist on Tuesday night, the Birmingham Mail reports.

The theft apparently occurred around 10:30 p.m. and was done in full view of on-site security cameras. The thieves entered the facility through a security-manned gate, connected their truck to a trailer that was holding the engines, and drove out, the Birmingham Mail writes. The whole event took place in just six minutes.

It is believed that the same truck came back later in the night, hooked up to another trailer filled with engines, and made off with more valuable car parts.

Factory employees were “stunned” by the heist. “The whole place is in uproar about it,” a source said to Birmingham Mail.

“We can confirm that we are working closely with West Midlands Police to investigate the theft of engines from the Solihull manufacturing plant,” a JLR spokespersons said. “A reward is on offer to anyone who has information which leads to the successful recovery of these engines.”

Following the heist, police were able to locate the stolen trailers, but are still looking for the motors and the thieves.

“Any information on the whereabouts of the engines or those involved in the thefts should be reported to Solihull police,” the JLR spokesperson said.

This article originally appeared on The Drive.

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Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

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Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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