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A row of townhouses in the Upper East Side neighborhood of New York
A row of townhouses in the Upper East Side neighborhood of New York
Richard Levine—Corbis via Getty Images

A seller affiliated with HNA Group Co., the Chinese conglomerate seeking buyers for real estate worldwide to stave off a liquidity crunch, has found a buyer for at least one Manhattan property: an Upper East Side mansion owned for less than a year.

The five-story property on East 64th Street was sold for $90 million, according to records filed with New York City on Wednesday — records signed by Chen Guoqing, the brother of an HNA co-founder. And it was hardly a fire sale: the home was purchased last April for quite a bit less — just $79.5 million. Both the buyer and seller were limited-liability corporations named simply for the mansion’s address.

A spokesman for HNA didn’t immediately respond to a phone call and email requesting comment on the sale. The transaction was reported earlier by the Real Deal. A representative for the buyer’s LLC also didn’t immediately respond.

Still on the market in New York and across the U.S. are commercial properties valued at a total of $4 billion, including 245 Park Ave., according to a marketing document seen by Bloomberg. That Manhattan skyscraper should command a much higher price: It was purchased, also less than a year ago, for $2.21 billion, among the most ever paid for an office building in the city.

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

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