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By Associated Press
January 18, 2018
PeopleImages—Getty Images

(BOSTON) A purported psychic who charged an elderly Massachusetts woman $3.5 million for exorcisms and “spiritual cleansing” has been sentenced for evading taxes.

Federal prosecutors say 41-year-old Sally Ann Johnson, of south Florida, was sentenced Wednesday to two years and two months in prison. She was ordered to repay the woman and pay $725,000 to the IRS.

Prosecutors say Johnson ran businesses that claimed to offer psychic readings and spiritual cleansing and strengthening.

Between 2007 and 2014, prosecutors say a Martha’s Vineyard woman paid Johnson about $3.5 million for services that claimed to rid the woman of demons.

Prosecutors say Johnson didn’t report the income and tried to hide the money to avoid paying taxes.

Johnson pleaded guilty in October to attempting to interfere with the administration of IRS laws.

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Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

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Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

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