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By Alicia Adamczyk
September 26, 2016
Bloomberg/Getty Images

Amazon Prime members are worth $143 billion to the company over their lifetimes, CNBC reports, based on an analysis by John Blackledge of Cowen and Company.

What’s more, that figure is very likely to grow: Blackledge says Prime is on track to add 12 million members in 2016, compared to 10 million last year and seven million in 2014.

He estimates that around 44% of U.S. households pay for the $99-per-year service, which includes free two-day shipping on eligible products and access to Amazon’s plentiful media library. But Blackledge told CNBC that the proportion of households who are Prime members could reach 50% by the end of the year. Data from Piper Jaffray released earlier this year indicates that more than 70% of households that earn more than $112,000 annually are members.

Read Next: Is Amazon Prime Worth It?

That’s obviously good news for Amazon, and even better when you consider that Prime members spend more on average than non-members; in fact, a report from Consumer Intelligence Research Partners puts average member expenditures at more than double what non-members spend per year.

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

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