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By Ethan Wolff-Mann
August 4, 2016
Andrew Burton—Getty Images

Of the big three music streaming players–that’s Spotify, Apple Music, and Tidal–two have had an advantage, being available on both major mobile platforms, iOS and Android. Apple Music, on the other hand, lagged.

In November of last year, Apple did open its Apple Music service to Android, but it was in beta, not officially primed for mainstream use. Beta, for the uninitiated, is often far more buggy since it’s like a soft-opening for a hotel or restaurant, implemented to get the kinks out before an official launch. Apple Music’s beta lasted nine months.

Read More: Spotify vs. Tidal vs. Apple Music: Music Streaming Services Compared

According to the Verge, a good chunk of the time was dedicated to speeding up the app to the iOS version’s standard. There are some unique features in the Android version, such as offline downloading to an SD card, since Android phones often have removable storage, something that Apple has fiercely eschewed.

So why would any Android customer choose Apple Music over Spotify, or make a switch from platforms? While the services are very similar and compete at the same price points, there are a few differences that could push one user over to the other side–like Apple’s unique Taylor Swift library.

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

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