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Save Room: February 2015
            Shot: Chocolate Thumbprint Cookies
            Photo Editor: Paden Reich
            Art Director: Bob Perino
            Prop Stylist: Caroline Cunningham
            Food Stylist: Vanessa Rocchio
Save Room: February 2015 Shot: Chocolate Thumbprint Cookies Photo Editor: Paden Reich Art Director: Bob Perino Prop Stylist: Caroline Cunningham Food Stylist: Vanessa Rocchio
Hector M Sanchez—All copy rights and ownership reserved by Hector M Sanchez

If you’ve ever had to toss a batch of chocolate chip cookies in the trash because the bottoms got a little too dark, you’ll want to keep reading. From flaky biscuits to scones to cookies to toasted nuts in the oven – anything you need to bake on a jellyroll pan has the potential to overbake on the bottom.

There’s one product, however, that’s made a world of difference in my kitchen: a silicone baking mat. As this isn’t a common item for many home cooks, I didn’t realize its baking powers until I ended up with one by accident. A friend was packing up her kitchen, and asked if there was anything I’d like to keep. I walked away with a couple of sheet pans stacked together; a few weeks later, I found the mat nestled in-between them.

Aside from my cookies turning out perfectly in an oven with wonky heat, one great reason that the siliicone baking mat deserves a spot in your kitchen is that you’ll no longer need to grease, spray, butter, line, or foil your pan when you’re cooking. Food can be baked directly on the mat, and you’d be shocked to see how easily burnt bits slide off when you’re cleaning.

Now, you won’t find me cooking on a sheet pan without a silicone baking mat, and my favorite – by far – is the Silpat. Silpat pioneeered the technology of baking mats in France and was the first product of its kind back in 1965. The material used in the mats is fiberglass mesh with a silicone coating; everything is food-grade certified and made from raw materials. Logistics aside, these silicone mats are unlike any other you’ve baked with. They can withstand temperatures from -40˚F to 480˚F, and each Silpat is guaranteed for 3,000 bakes. That’s a whole lot of biscuits.

A silicone mat is a great kitchen gift for a bridal shower, or it’s a $30 not-so-splurge for your own kitchen. Beyond baking, you can use the mat for roasting meat (spatchcock chicken, anyone?) or fish and preparing savory items. If these reasons haven’t swayed you, how about the fact that you’ll no longer be scrubbing baked-on food off of greasy sheet pans?

Silicone mats come in all shapes and sizes, so you’ll be able to find one for all of your baking ventures. The mats come in full and half-size sheets, petite jelly roll, macaron mats, and cake circles. No more measuring and cutting parchment for your cake layers – and no more messy clean-up.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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