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At 11 p.m. on Nov. 11, 1918, the guns of World War I fell silent as the warring parties signed the armistice that would end the most destructive conflict the world had ever seen at that time. Although the Treaty of Versailles officially ended the Great War in 1919, the world would forever honor those who served by dedicating Nov. 11 as Armistice Day.

Armistice Day became a federal holiday in 1938 in the United States. In 1954, after World War I, World War II and the Korean War, it was changed to Veterans Day to honor those who served and continue to serve.

Read More: 34 Veterans Day 2016 Deals and Freebies

Banks Closed on Veterans Day

The Federal Reserve Bank, and all of its offices and branches, are closed on all federal holidays, including Veterans Day. Private banks, however, sometimes choose to close, remain open or shorten their hours. The vast majority of banks follow the lead of the Federal Reserve and close in observance of Veterans Day.

The following banks will be closed for business on Nov. 11.

  • Bank of America
  • Bank of the West
  • BBVA Compass Bank
  • BB&T
  • BMO Harris
  • Capital One Bank
  • Chase Bank
  • Citibank
  • Citizens Bank
  • Comerica
  • Fifth Third Bank
  • First Niagara Bank
  • Huntington Bank
  • Huntington State Bank
  • KeyBank
  • M&T Bank
  • People’s United Bank
  • Regions Bank
  • Santander Bank
  • Union Bank
  • Wells Fargo

Read More: What Are Liquid Assets?

Banks Open on Veterans Day

A handful of banks will be open on Veterans Day — specifically banks inside grocery stores. Customers of the following banks can make transactions on Nov. 11, but always call ahead to be sure.

  • HSBC: All branches open.
  • PNC Bank: Traditional branches are closed, but most in-store locations remain open.
  • SunTrust Bank: Traditional branches will be closed, but in-store locations will remain open.
  • TD Bank: All branches open.
  • U.S. Bank: Some branches might be open. Call your specific location to find out.

Even though most banks are closed on Veterans Day, many keep their call centers open to handle customer service needs. Most banks have mobile apps and online banking options that customers can utilize on federal holidays like Veterans Day, but keep in mind that Nov. 11 is not considered a business day.

This article originally appeared on GoBankingRates.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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