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Jeff Harris for Money; Prop styling by Renee Flugge

Ready to move up professionally? Money worked with PayScale.com to identify the skills that distinguish executives and managers from employees further down the ladder.

The graphic below identifies the top 10 in each category; the bigger the text size, the greater the difference between the higher-level workers and their subordinates.

To see full coverage of Money’s Best Career Skills 2016, click here.

It’s worth noting that some of talents highlighted below are also associated with significantly higher salaries — but that’s not true for all. After all, at senior levels, a quality like leadership is simply table stakes.

NOTE: Skills here are disproportionately more likely to appear in executive or manager/supervisor profiles than in lower-level jobs. SOURCES: PayScale.com, Money research. | Money
Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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