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Employees prepare fried chicken sandwiches for guests during an event ahead of the grand opening for a Chick-fil-A restaurant in New York, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. Chick-fil-A, the Southern chicken-sandwich chain that has drawn both controversy and copycats over the years, has finally arrived in New York. The company will open a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter), three-level restaurant in Manhattan's Garment District that will be the chain's largest location in the nation. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Employees prepare fried chicken sandwiches for guests during an event ahead of the grand opening for a Chick-fil-A restaurant in New York, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. Chick-fil-A, the Southern chicken-sandwich chain that has drawn both controversy and copycats over the years, has finally arrived in New York. The company will open a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter), three-level restaurant in Manhattan's Garment District that will be the chain's largest location in the nation. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

Everyone knows about Chick-fil-A’s company policy to never open on a Sunday. But have you noticed the other, even subtler thing their team members refuse to do?

When customers say “thank you,” members of Chick-fil-A’s notoriously cheerful staff almost never answer with a typical “you’re welcome.” Instead, their go-to response is decidedly more mannerly. “My pleasure,” they say as they hand over the goods.

Recently, Taste of Home set out to discover the origin of unique this store policy. According to Chick-fil-A lore, the chain’s founder, Truett Cathy, got the idea while staying at a Ritz Carlton. When he said “thank you” to a hotel employee, he was pleasantly surprised when the employee replied, “my pleasure.” In Cathy’s mind, those two small words made the Ritz Carlton stand out as a luxury establishment, so he brought it into practice in his own restaurants.

A Chick-fil-A employee confirmed that the “my pleasure” policy is an important, though unofficial, part of company culture on Reddit.

“‘You’re welcome’ seems too indifferent, and we’re told to use elevated language,” the employee explained.

Kristen Hunter, a marketing consultant for the restaurant chain, told Client Heartbeat that it’s an important part of Chick-fil-A’s reputation for going the extra mile.

“The first mile is the foundation—good customer service, hot food hot, cold food cold,” she said. “The second mile is what we do that’s remarkable.”

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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