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By Kerry Close
March 3, 2016
Craig Warga—Bloomberg via Getty Images

If you want a quick trip to work in the morning, you might want to avoid taking a job in New York City.

Rushed commuters in the Big Apple spend on average nearly 35 minutes in transit each way, a new report from real estate website Trulia found.

It was followed by Long Island, at 33 minutes; Washington, D.C., at 32.8 minutes; Newark, N.J., at 31.1 minutes; and Chicago, at 30.8 minutes. Metro areas that sit adjacent to the Atlantic Ocean made up 7 of the top 10 cities with the longest commutes. A notable exception? Los Angeles, known for its heavy traffic, reported an average commute time of 27.6 minutes.

You’re in luck if you’re employed in Buffalo, N.Y., where workers commute a little over 20 minutes on average. It’s followed by fellow mid-size metro areas: Columbus, Ohio, at 21.8 minutes and Hartford, Conn. at 22.3 minutes.

If you live in a city, you’re probably going to spend a fair amount of your day on a bus or a train. Commute times in the 50 largest U.S. metro areas have steadily increased to an average of 27.2 minutes in 2014, up from 26.4 minutes in 2009. Yet that might not be an important figure for many workers. Only 15.9% of Americans said short commutes or proximity to public transit were among their top priorities when deciding where to live.

But there is one group—millennials—that cares about having a short commute to work. The report found that people between 18 to 34 years old value proximity to work and public transportation as more important than living in a neighborhood with a low crime rate.

There’s also a difference between the commute times for renters compared to homeowners. The report found that renters in Riverside-San Bernardino, Calif; Houston, Tex.; and Long Island had the shortest commutes compared to those who own their homes. However, that’s not the case if you’re a New Yorker, where renters and owners alike have the highest commute times in the nation.

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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