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By Martha C. White
August 17, 2016
Bloomberg—Bloomberg/Getty Images

The labor market is picking up so much that companies are hiring faster these days, a welcome change for candidates used to a long, drawn-out hiring process.

Between April and June, the number of days a job stays vacant fell by a day, according to USA Today. Using data from staffing company DHI Group, it found that the average duration of a vacancy dropped to 28.3 days in June.

Companies are interviewing fewer candidates and making job offers faster today because the 4.9% unemployment rate has made it tougher to find workers for all sorts of jobs. The rush for workers is taking place throughout the labor pool as companies try to fill everything from warehouse jobs to IT management positions.

Read More: 5 Signs You Definitely Shouldn’t Take the Job

They’re also adjusting to a tighter job market by changing their strategies, USA Today said. Nearly half are now widening their search for candidates to encompass a larger area, and 12% said they’ve relaxed their degree or skill requirements — good news for people who have been stuck on the sidelines because they don’t have a college degree.

For harder-to-fill jobs that require more specialized skills like IT or financial management, employers have resorted to group interviews to speed things up. “Companies are compressing interview rounds into shorter periods, conducting them with panels of managers, or using Skype,” USA Today said.

So if your next job interview has you facing not just one but a roomful of people and their questions, take a deep breath: This is what a recovery looks like.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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