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By Brad Tuttle
September 26, 2016
Roger Daltrey of The Who.
Roger Daltrey of The Who.
Yui Mok—AP

The upcoming music festival featuring the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney, and The Who—dubbed unofficially as “Oldchella”—has been sold out for months. That’s what fans were told anyway. The truth is that tickets can be had right now, and they’re super easy to buy.

Music fans were told in May that demand was so high for the festival, taking place in early October at the same California venue as the annual Coachella shows, that a second weekend of shows was added. Tickets for both weekends supposedly sold out almost immediately. Only fans can readily buy tickets right now directly from concert organizers at DesertTrip.com. Tons of tickets are also being sold on secondary market sites too—sometimes for less than their original purchase price.

Apparently, Goldenvoice, the company running the music festival in Indio, Calif., released more tickets for sale more than a week ago. As of Monday, September 26, tickets could be purchased quickly and easily through the main sales site.

Single-day tickets, priced at $199, were not posted for sale in the most recent offering. But weekend passes, priced at $399 for general admission, as well as a variety of other VIP admission and reserved floor seating options, were available. We priced out two general admission passes for the October 7-9 weekend, and the total came to $870 after a $72 “convenience fee” was added in.

Despite the sky-high demand for seats when they first went on sale, it even looks possible now for fans to buy tickets for below face value. Secondary market sites such as Vivid Seats and StubHub are listing weekend passes starting around $300 for the first weekend, and as low as $250 for the second weekend. Single-day tickets for the show on Saturday, October 8, featuring Neil Young and Paul McCartney, are being listed as low as $159.

Before snagging your tickets, however, take note that admission is only one part of how much it costs to attend Desert Trip. Among the other expenses fans may need to cover are shuttle passes for getting around the venue ($25), parking ($50 to $150), camping ($99 for a tent, up to $1,600 for luxury teepee accommodations), and food.

Read Next: How to Buy Tickets for Desert Trip, the ‘Oldchella’ Music Festival

Fast Company recently highlighted how Desert Trip is likely to be the “Best-Tasting Rock Festival Ever,” with loads of celebrity chefs and trendy artisanal fare. Unsurprisingly, it won’t come cheap: The cost of a one-day “Culinary Experience,” which covers an afternoon and evening’s worth of dining and drinking, is $179. That’s the low-cost option, compared with the $225 being charged for the special four-course prix-fixe dinner.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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