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By Kerry Close
September 26, 2016
Elite female participants run through the streets of Manhattan during the TCS New York City Marathon on November 1, 2015 in New York City.
Elite female participants run through the streets of Manhattan during the TCS New York City Marathon on November 1, 2015 in New York City.
Daniel Zuchnik—Getty Images

Running a marathon and need an extra push in your training? If your time is speedy enough, you could win a free pair of sneakers.

Strava, a run tracking app that doubles as a social network, will give a free pair of New Balance sneakers to marathon runners who “negative split” their race, CNET reported. In ultra-runner speak, that means completing the second half of the 26.2-mile race faster than the first.

Easy enough for a good pacer, right? Not quite, according to Strava: Just 4.7% of users reported that they negative-splitted a major marathon in 2017. For long-distance runners who wear regularly down their $100+ shoes in a matter of months, though, going the extra mile — or at least running them faster — could be well worth it.

Read More: The $4,000 Price of Running the Boston Marathon

To enter the challenge, runners must complete a marathon certified by USA Track & Field between October 9 and December 6 and upload the race to the Strava app. They then must fill out a submission form, which also includes providing a link to the official marathon results, on the Strava website. If you qualify, you’ll receive a promo code for your free pair of sneakers.

Interestingly, New Balance is in the minority among athletic apparel companies in that it doesn’t own a fitness app. Under Armour bought MapMyFitness for $150 million in November 2013, while Adidas bought Runtastic in August 2015 and Asics snatched up Runkeeper in February.

 

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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