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By Associated Press
January 20, 2018
David Solomon, co-president and co-COO of Goldman Sachs, speaks during the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California, on May 1, 2017
David Solomon, co-president and co-COO of Goldman Sachs, speaks during the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California, on May 1, 2017
Bloomberg/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) — A former domestic employee of Goldman Sachs President David Solomon has been arrested in Los Angeles on charges he stole over $1 million of rare wine from his boss, authorities said Wednesday.

Charges against Nicolas DeMeyer, arrested Tuesday night, were in a federal indictment unsealed in Manhattan. The indictment contained a single count: interstate transportation of stolen property.

According to the indictment, DeMeyer stole hundreds of bottles of wine worth over $1.2 million from 2014 to late 2016. It was unclear who will represent DeMeyer at an initial court appearance in Los Angeles federal court.

Goldman Sachs said in a statement on Solomon’s behalf that the theft was discovered in 2016 and reported to law enforcement then. The company referred other questions to authorities.

The indictment said DeMeyer’s job duties included receiving wine shipments at Solomon’s Manhattan apartment and transporting them to Solomon’s wine cellar in East Hampton, New York.

DeMeyer used the alias “Mark Miller” to sell wine he stole to a North Carolina-based wine dealer he located on the internet, the indictment said.

The stolen wine included bottles from the French estate Domaine de la Romanee-Conti, considered among the best, most expensive and rarest wines in the world, according to the indictment.

The indictment said DeMeyer in October 2016 stole seven bottles of DRC wine for which Solomon had paid $133,650.

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