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By Associated Press
February 9, 2018
The Hindenburg, a large German commercial passenger-carrying rigid airship, destroyed by fire on May 6, 1937, at the end of the first North American transatlantic journey at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in Manchester Township, N.J.
The Hindenburg, a large German commercial passenger-carrying rigid airship, destroyed by fire on May 6, 1937, at the end of the first North American transatlantic journey at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in Manchester Township, N.J.
Universal History Archive / Getty Images

(BOSTON) — A swatch of canvas recovered from the wreckage of the Hindenburg has sold for more than $36,000 at auction.Boston-based RR Auction says the piece of red cotton canvas was picked up at the disaster site by a teenager whose father was working the dock when the German airship exploded on May 6, 1937 in New Jersey.The auction house says a known collector of Americana, who does not want to be identified, paid $36,282 for the 6.25 by 5-inch (12.7 by 15.9 centimeter) piece of fabric during Wednesday night’s auction. The pre-auction estimate was up to $5,000.

Auction officials say the piece is unique because it is not gray, like most of the canvas from the airship, and must have come from the giant Nazi flags that were emblazoned on the tailfins.

 

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Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

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