Many companies featured on Money advertise with us. Opinions are our own, but compensation and
in-depth research determine where and how companies may appear. Learn more about how we make money.

Advertiser Disclosure

Money has partnered with CardRatings.com and ConsumersAdvocate.org, among other companies, for our coverage of credit card products. Money, CardRatings.com, and ConsumersAdvocate.org may receive a commission from card issuers. For example, Money receives a commission from Citi when you apply and are approved for a Citi product through the links on this site.

Opinions expressed here are the author's alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airline or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

By Susie Poppick
December 24, 2015
Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

Hyatt, the Chicago-based hotel chain, announced Wednesday that it had discovered a virus on computers used to process payments for some of its hotel locations.

The company cautioned that guests should review their credit-card account statements carefully and report any unauthorized charges immediately.

“As soon as Hyatt discovered the activity, the company launched an investigation and engaged leading third-party cyber security experts,” Hyatt wrote in a statement.

Hyatt joins a number of other hotel businesses that have recently been compromised by hackers, including Hilton Worldwide, Mandarin Oriental, and Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide. A recent study actually found that most big hotel chains have vulnerable computer systems.

Read More: Hyatt Is Getting Rid of On-Demand Porn in Hotel Rooms, Because Wi-Fi

If you have stayed with Hyatt, review your credit-card statement right away for any unusual activity. Most card companies won’t hold you liable for fraudulent charges—and even if they do, the maximum you could get dinged is only $50, by law.

Hyatt will be posting updates regarding its investigation at hyatt.com/protectingourcustomers. Concerned customers can also call 1-877-218-3036. The chain says it “has taken steps to strengthen the security of its systems” since the hacking.

Advertiser Disclosure

Money has partnered with CardRatings.com and ConsumersAdvocate.org, among other companies, for our coverage of credit card products. Money, CardRatings.com, and ConsumersAdvocate.org may receive a commission from card issuers. For example, Money receives a commission from Citi when you apply and are approved for a Citi product through the links on this site.

Opinions expressed here are the author's alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airline or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

EDIT POST