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By Ethan Wolff-Mann
October 29, 2015
Kohei Hara—Getty Images

If you’re one of those people who’s constantly glued to your phone, you probably don’t perform iOS updates during the day— that’s peak Instagram time (or whatever your preferred time-waster is). You probably wait until you’re about to close your eyes for seven hours before you hit the “update” button. Unfortunately, this strategy could do you more harm than good.

People who hit “yes” when their iPhone asked if it should perform an overnight update to the latest iOS 9.1—which adds 150 new emojis and a new photo feature—discovered that while the phone successfully updated overnight, it also deactivated their alarms.

Which caused some people to miss important meetings.

Like a court date.

It did however, create a new alarm for one person—a phone call from the boss!

This has happened before. In 2010, a Daylight Saving Time issue tripped up the iPhone alarm system, the Verge noted.

If you don’t want to hurt your career, and absolutely need to update your iPhone, do it manually from the “setting” menu instead of simply hitting yes when the pop-up asks if you want to automatically update. Or use an actual alarm clock. They still exist.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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