Many companies featured on Money advertise with us. Opinions are our own, but compensation and
in-depth research determine where and how companies may appear. Learn more about how we make money.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

By Jonathan Stempel / Reuters
Updated: May 13, 2016 9:42 AM ET
Inside a Lowe's home improvement store in Chicago, Illinois on Jan. 24, 2013.
Inside a Lowe's home improvement store in Chicago, Illinois on Jan. 24, 2013.
Scott Olson—Getty Images

Lowe’s has reached an $8.6 million settlement of a U.S. agency lawsuit accusing the nation’s second-largest home improvement retailer of illegally firing workers who went on medical leave for a long time.

The accord resolves Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that Lowe’s violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by terminating employees whose medical leaves of absence exceeded the company’s 180- or 240-day maximum leave policy.

A consent decree detailing the settlement was approved on Thursday by U.S. District Judge Andre Birotte in Los Angeles.

It requires Lowe’s to retain consultants to oversee its leave of absence policies, and track workers’ requests for accommodations. The Mooresville, North Carolina-based company also agreed to improve employee training.

Lowe’s denied wrongdoing in agreeing to settle. The decree lasts for four years.

Karen Cobb, a Lowe’s spokeswoman, said the company updated its leave of absence policies in 2010, and has since taken to steps “to ensure consistency in applying our policies and help employees manage their leaves of absence and accommodations.”

The EEOC did not immediately respond on Friday to a request for comment.

The case stemmed from EEOC charges filed between 2007 and 2010 that Lowe’s fired three workers after unreasonably refusing to grant them extended medical leave.

The case is U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission v Lowe’s Cos et al, U.S. District Court, Central District of California, No. 16-03041.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

EDIT POST