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By Kerry Close
June 16, 2016
Maple syrup production has reached an all-time high this year.
Maple syrup production has reached an all-time high this year.
Education Images—UIG via Getty Images

The U.S. and Canada may be in somewhat of a sticky situation: The two nations have produced record amounts of maple syrup this year.

Statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture showed that the U.S. produced 4.2 million gallons of syrup this year, the highest amount since record-keeping began in 1916, the Burlington Free Press reported. Canada, which supplies 70% of the world’s syrup, produced 13.5 million gallons this year, a 23% increase from the previous record set in 2013.

Vermont, the nation’s largest syrup producer, yielded 1.9 million gallons, besting its previous record of 1.48 million gallons in 2013. In Vermont, the increase was also augmented by the number of taps in trees jumping to about 5 million now from about a million 15 years ago. New York followed Vermont’s syrup production with 707,000 gallons this year, trailed by Maine, Wisconsin and New Hampshire.

Nationally, the syrupy spike is attributable to favorable weather—cold nights and warn days—and more people getting into the business or expanding their production. Bruce Burnor told the Burlington Free Press that his family’s business in Eden, Vermont has its best year ever, producing 800 gallons—up from its previous record of 550 gallons.

“Because the price has been good and stable, we’ve had many more people get into the business. Others expand,” Henry Marckres, the maple specialist at the Vermont agency of agriculture, told the Burlington Free Press.

Read More: Your Insatiable Love of Bacon Is Causing Prices to Soar

Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like high quantities of maple syrup will translate into lower consumer prices, Mackres said. Maple syrup currently retails for about $48 to $52 a gallon.

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