Shoppers crowd the entrance to the Costco store on Oct. 5, 2016 in Altamonte Springs, Fla,. as central Floridians prepare for the anticipated strike of Hurricane Matthew.
Shoppers crowd the entrance to the Costco store on Oct. 5, 2016 in Altamonte Springs, Fla,. as central Floridians prepare for the anticipated strike of Hurricane Matthew.Joe Burbank—Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images
Shoppers crowd the entrance to the Costco store on Oct. 5, 2016 in Altamonte Springs, Fla,. as central Floridians prepare for the anticipated strike of Hurricane Matthew.
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Customers shop for flashlights and batteries at a Home Depot Inc. store in Miami, Florida, on Oct. 4, 2016.
A customer grabs Publix Super Markets Inc. brand purified water bottles at the company's store ahead of Hurricane Matthew making landfall in West Palm Beach, Florida, on Oct. 5, 2016. Hurricane Matthew has thousands fleeing the U.S. Southeast where its expected to batter the coastline and threaten electricity supplies to more than 1 million people. Potential losses are seen as high as $15 billion.
Customers browse empty shelves at a Publix Super Markets Inc. store ahead of Hurricane Matthew making landfall in West Palm Beach, Florida, on Oct. 5, 2016.
A sign is seen in the door of a cafe in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina on October 6, 2016 as Hurricane Matthew makes its way towards the United States.
A resident walks past a wall of sandbags protecting a store in one of the city's low-lying areas before the arrival of Hurricane Matthew, in Charleston, South Carolina, October 7, 2016.
Lisa's Gifts at the Daytona Beach Boardwalk and Pier stands closed and boarded up ahead of Hurricane Matthew in Daytona Beach, Fla. on Oct. 6, 2016.
Ticketing machines are covered in plastic and flights in and out of the Palm Beach International airport in the afternoon as Hurricane Matthew advances, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, in West Palm Beach, Fla. The National Hurricane Center in Miami said the storm's maximum sustained winds had strengthened to 140 mph as of late Thursday morning and were expected to maintain their strength as the storm approaches the Florida coast.
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A gas station's pumps are wrapped and closed as many stations in south Florida are out of gas in Miami, Florida on October 6, 2016.
A boarded up IHOP restaurant has messages to Hurricane Matthew written on the plywood as it sits closed ahead of Hurricane Matthew on Cocoa Beach, Florida on October 5, 2016.
A closed sign is seen at the Exploration Tower in Port Canaveral, Florida on October 5, 2016 as Hurricane Matthew heads north toward the east coast of Florida, possibly as a category 4 hurricane. The storm has killed 10 people in Caribbean countries and evacuations are underway in Florida and South Carolina.
A lone taxi heads toward the Walt Disney World Resort area in Orlando, Florida, before the landfall of Hurricane Matthew, on October 6, 2016.
A sign in a shop window explains that they are closed due to the threat of Hurricane Matthew, in the mostly-empty historic district of Charleston, South Carolina on October 6, 2016.
Shoppers crowd the entrance to the Costco store on Oct. 5, 2016 in Altamonte Springs, Fla,. as central Floridians prepar
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Joe Burbank—Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images
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See How Hurricane Matthew Is Impacting Businesses and Homeowners

With Hurricane Matthew set to hit the southeastern U.S. on Friday, 2 million people have evacuated the region, and most businesses are battening down the hatches.

The insurance industry is estimating that Matthew could cause as much as $30 billion in damages, putting it in league with Hurricane Sandy, which wreaked $20 billion in damage to northeastern states in 2012. Meanwhile, businesses from Florida's world-famous theme parks to standbys like Waffle House have closed up shop ahead of the storm. Friday represents only the fourth time in the history of Walt Disney World that its theme parks are closed, and guests who are staying at Disney hotels have been advised to remain indoors.

Even if Matthew isn't as monumental a storm as predicted, the hurricane will be extremely costly to businesses. Still there is one silver lining, according to economists: Economic damage from natural disasters like storms is usually temporary. Lost sales are made up by pent-up demand when residents return to their homes; new construction to repair damaged roads and buildings eventually provides and economic jolt to make up for initial losses. Homeowners also spend thousands of dollars preparing for the arrival of hurricanes, with advance purchases of everything from blankets to battery-powered radios.

Read Next: How to Help the Victims of Hurricane Matthew

For residents and homeowners, however, hurricanes cause nothing but hassles and heartache, including but not limited to the expense of fleeing the storm and the potential for injuries and even death. There are sometimes opportunistic local businesses to contend with as well. News outlets have received reports of price gouging at Florida gas stations, where worried evacuees have been lining up to fill their tanks.

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