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By Associated Press
March 20, 2018
Andrew Bret Wallis—Getty Images

CARY, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina man has been accused of leaving his mother on their home’s floor because he knew she would probably die and that he would get access to $30,000 she had in a bank account.

The News & Observer of Raleigh reports 39-year-old Eric Paul Brunner was arrested March 13 and charged with murder and elder abuse. Warrants and other information from Wake County sheriff’s deputies say 74-year-old Cynthia Brunner had fallen “more than 24 hours” before her son and caretaker reported her death Feb. 19.

Investigator J.N. Yoakum says Brunner “wanted her to die” and admitted that “he and his mother have had a tenuous relationship.”

Brunner is being held without bail and is scheduled for a court hearing April 14. It is unclear if he has a lawyer.

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

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Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

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