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By Brad Tuttle
November 7, 2016
Don Emmert—AFP/Getty Images

It’ll be super easy to keep up with the latest election news this week even if you don’t subscribe to a newspaper or a pay TV package.

Major newspapers like the New York Times, which has had a digital paywall limiting access to its content since 2011, are allowing non-subscribers to click on as many stories as they want around Election Day. The Dish Network-owned Sling TV online service is also welcoming viewers to stream election coverage from channels such as CNN, Bloomberg, BBC World News, and HLN at no charge.

The waiving of paywalls is a way for these outlets to let potential paying customers sample the product, while simultaneously promoting interest in the election and supporting the democratic process.

“This is an important moment for our country,” Arthur Sulzberger Jr., publisher of The New York Times, said in a statement regarding his company’s decision to drop the paywall. “Independent journalism is crucial to democracy and I believe there is no better time to show readers the type of original journalism The New York Times creates every day.”

Here are the details for getting free access to the nytimes.com, Sling TV, and some other sources this week:

New York Times: From Monday, November 7, through 11:59 p.m. on Wednesday, November 9, readers can view as many pieces of content as they want, without having to worry about hitting a paywall.

Sling: From 9 a.m. ET on Tuesday, November 8, through 4 a.m. on Wednesday, November 9, any new customer can stream 20+ pay channels in a Sling TV package simply by registering with an email address and a password—no credit card required. The service normally allows a free seven-day trial period, but it requires a credit card, and users will be charged the monthly fee (starting at $20) if they don’t cancel before the trial period ends.

CNN.com: For 24 hours straight starting at 4 p.m. ET on Election Day, cnn.com will livestream the election coverage on CNN in its entirety.

Washington Post: Unlimited, free access to the site on Election Day, November 8.

Orlando Sentinel: The largest newspaper in central Florida offers free unlimited access to election coverage this week, starting on Monday.

Read Next: How to Get a Delicious Craft Beer for Just $1 on Election Day

Minneapolis Star Tribune: All online content is available for free to non-subscribers from 7 a.m. Tuesday until 1 p.m. on Wednesday.

Delaware Online: The entire site is available free of charge to mobile and desktop readers on Tuesday and Wednesday.

The Telegram & Gazette: Readers get unrestricted, free access to this news source in central Massachusetts from Monday through Thursday this week.

USA Today Network: A broad range of newspapers like the Burlington Free Press (Vermont) and the Lansing State Journal (Michigan) are available to all readers on Tuesday and Wednesday without hitting a paywall.

Miami Herald: Readers get unlimited access to all content this week.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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