Many companies featured on Money advertise with us. Opinions are our own, but compensation and
in-depth research determine where and how companies may appear. Learn more about how we make money.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

By Martha C. White
July 13, 2016
JIM WATSON—AFP/Getty Images

Media outlets, including this one, have noted that Pokémon Go—the insanely popular mobile app game that’s rendering otherwise rational adults oblivious to everything in their path—has given a boost to small businesses like coffee shops and pizzerias near locations sought out by players.

Now it appears that another group of entrepreneurs are finding a way to profit off the craze: Clever drivers for services like Uber and its competitors, who are advertising their services to help Pokémon players cover more ground faster (and, presumably, more safely, since somebody else will be the one watching the road).

Gig economy types with vehicles around the country have taken to sites like Craigslist to advertise themselves as freelance Pokémon Go chauffeurs, and quick-thinking sellers of everything from external phone batteries to secondhand bicycles are also jumping on the Craigslist Pokémon bandwagon.

Other gig-economy workers taking advantage of the game’s popularity are pitching themselves as Pokémon Go egg hunters, security providers, and hackers, according to The Ringer.

Some of these dreams of riches might be more fanciful than others. The Ringer added that one man advertising his service “hatching” Pokémon eggs hadn’t gotten responses from game players eager to get ahead—just curious media types looking for a viral story.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

EDIT POST