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By Kerri Anne Renzulli and Susie Poppick
November 5, 2015

When it comes to gender-based pay inequality, not all states are created equal.

Working women in Louisiana, it turns out, make 6% less than their male colleagues, even after controlling for factors like job title, years of experience, education, skills, management responsibilities, and company size, according to a new report released Thursday by PayScale.

That’s the greatest pay gap of any U.S. state, according to the study, which collected data on 1.4 million full-time employees between July 2013 and July 2015. In fact, when the report compared the median male and female pay without controlling for any other factors, Louisiana’s pay gap jumped to 30.1% — meaning women in Louisiana are making almost a third less than their male counterparts.

Three other states also had controlled wage gaps greater than 5% and uncontrolled wage gaps greater than 25%: Alabama, West Virginia, and Wyoming. And while no states had a wage gap of zero, three states did have an adjusted difference of less than 1% between male and female earnings. Connecticut and Nevada tied for the state with the most equal gender pay, followed by Maryland.

Find out how big the controlled wage gap is in your state:

Read next: Best and Worst U.S. Cities for Women’s Pay Equality

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

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