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A Wal-Mart Super Center in Plano, Texas
A Wal-Mart Super Center in Plano, Texas
Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

Walmart might not be the first place you think to look for a bottle of wine, but the retail giant recently launched its own branded line of wines called Winemakers Selection. No surprise, they’re very affordable, going for just $11 a bottle. It’s no Trader Joe’s two-buck Chuck (which retails for up to $3.99 in some states) but it’s a steal nonetheless.

Walmart isn’t the only big box store selling its own branded wine, either. Just this week, 7-Eleven launched a new, private label called Voyager Pint.

So, in light of these two additions to the mass-market wine scene, we’ve rounded up six unexpected big-box stores selling their own labels, with bottles that all retail for under $15 each.

Walmart

Walmart recently launched a collection of 10 bottles called the Winemakers Selection. The wines are sourced from California, Italy, and France, and each one costs just $11. That’s a steal, especially given the fact that Nichole Simpson, a wine buyer for Walmart, says that the wine tastes more like “a $30 to $40 bottle.”

Target

Last year, Target released a line of $5 wines called California Roots, which includes a red blend, Cabernet, Pinot Grigio, Chardonnay, and Moscato. Yes Way Rosé—which became the bottle of the moment after popping up all over Instagram—also hit Target shelves earlier this year.

Lidl

This German chain carries an award-winning Chianti that’s less than $10. Lidl also unveiled a line of sparkling wines this year, one of which—Crémant de Bourgogne Blanc NV—earned the Silver Outstanding award at the International Wine & Spirits Competition. That’s a high honor, but the price point might be even more enticing: It’s only $8.

Aldi

Aldi’s $7 One Road Shiraz earned a gold-rating from The Great Australian Shiraz Challenge. The grocery store chain also restocked its $8 bottle of award-winning Côtes de Provence Rosé for the summer. Planning a wedding on a budget? Yesterday, Aldi unveiled it’s “Party Packages,” which lets customers in the UK customize a wine list with bottles for as little as $9 each.

7-Eleven

If you weren’t already aware, the convenience store best known for its slushy machines sells wine, and they’ve just launched a new wine, called Voyager Point, which retails for just $10. The chain has been selling wines since 2009, when it launched the Yosemite Road label, and last year debuted the Trojan Horse line.

Costco

Here, you’ll find Kirkland Signature wines, with prices starting at just $9. Bonus? You can buy these wines even if you don’t have a membership. At the 2018 PLMA 2018 International Salute to Excellence Awards, Kirkland Signature Series Stag’s Leap District 2015 won the Best Quality award in the Cabernet Sauvignon category.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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