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By Associated Press
March 17, 2018
James  Whitey  Bulger sits at his sentencing hearing in federal court in Boston on Nov. 13, 2013. He was found guilty on 31 counts, including both racketeering charges, and was found to have been involved in 11 murders.
James "Whitey" Bulger sits at his sentencing hearing in federal court in Boston on Nov. 13, 2013. He was found guilty on 31 counts, including both racketeering charges, and was found to have been involved in 11 murders.
Jane Flavell Collins—AP

(BOSTON) — The purported prison identification card of Boston gangster James “Whitey” Bulger is on the auction block.

Lelands.com is selling the badge, which features Bulger’s picture, birthday and Federal Bureau of Prisons ID number. Lelands wouldn’t explain how it obtained the card, saying the person who provided it wished to remain anonymous.

The 88-year-old is serving a life sentence after being convicted in 2013 of a litany of crimes, including participating in 11 murders. He was one of the FBI’s most wanted fugitives for 16 years until his 2011 arrest in Santa Monica, California.

The highest bid for the ID as of Saturday morning was more than $1,600. Bidding closes on March 23.

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

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