5 critical action steps every first-time homebuyer must know
arrow
David Bach’s
arrow First-Time Homebuyer Challenge
Get Access Now Learn More

Many companies featured on Money advertise with us. Opinions are our own, but compensation and
in-depth research determine where and how companies may appear. Learn more about how we make money.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

By Mallika Mitra
Updated: July 22, 2020 10:20 AM ET
Getty Images

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to cause layoffs across the country, nearly every state has introduced extended benefits for unemployed residents.

Tens of millions of Americans are still out of work—1.3 million new people joined the unemployment roll in the week ending July 11 alone, according to the Labor Department—and the extra $600 a week they’ve been getting from the CARES Act is expected to expire at the end of the month.

Unemployment benefits typically last up to 26 weeks, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP). But under the CARES Act, states are providing at least 13 weeks of additional federally funded benefits to people who exhaust their typical state benefits. In states with “high unemployment,” those benefits are extended even further — another 13 to 20 weeks, according to the CBPP. Workers who don’t qualify for traditional unemployment benefits can get benefits through the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA).

Ads by Ad Practitioners
Personal Loans can provide financial relief during an emergency.
Personal loans can be used for multiple things, like paying medical bills and consolidating high-interest debt. Click your state to see if you qualify!
HawaiiAlaskaFloridaSouth CarolinaGeorgiaAlabamaNorth CarolinaTennesseeRIRhode IslandCTConnecticutMAMassachusettsMaineNHNew HampshireVTVermontNew YorkNJNew JerseyDEDelawareMDMarylandWest VirginiaOhioMichiganArizonaNevadaUtahColoradoNew MexicoSouth DakotaIowaIndianaIllinoisMinnesotaWisconsinMissouriLouisianaVirginiaDCWashington DCIdahoCaliforniaNorth DakotaWashingtonOregonMontanaWyomingNebraskaKansasOklahomaPennsylvaniaKentuckyMississippiArkansasTexas
See Today's Rates
ADVERTISEMENT

Here are the number of weeks available via regular unemployment insurance and extended benefits in each state (not including the 13 weeks that were added under the CARES Act).

*Note: Money updated this story to reflect that, as of July 21, extended benefits have kicked in for 49 states (all but South Dakota), the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico due to high levels of unemployment nationwide

Alabama

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 14 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 7 weeks

Alaska

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

Arizona

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Arkansas

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 20 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 10 weeks

California

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

Colorado

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Connecticut

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Delaware

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

District of Columbia

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Florida

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 12 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 6 weeks

Georgia

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

Hawaii

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Idaho

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Illinois

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

Indiana

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Iowa

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Kansas

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

Kentucky

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

Louisiana

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Maine

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Maryland

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Massachusetts

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Michigan

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Minnesota

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Mississippi

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Missouri

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 20 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 10 weeks

Montana

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 28 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Nebraska

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Nevada

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

New Hampshire

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

New Jersey

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

New Mexico

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

New York

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

North Carolina

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 12 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 9.6 weeks

North Dakota

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Ohio

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

Oklahoma

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Oregon

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

Pennsylvania

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Puerto Rico

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Rhode Island

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

South Carolina

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 20 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 16 weeks

South Dakota

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 0 weeks

Tennessee

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Texas

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

Utah

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Vermont

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

Virginia

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Washington

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 20 weeks

West Virginia

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Wisconsin

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Wyoming

Regular Unemployment Insurance: 26 weeks

Extended Benefits Available: 13 weeks

Ads by Ad Practitioners
You never know when you might find yourself financially strapped - the good news is you have options.
A personal loan can help you mitigate losses and get back on track. Click here to explore your options!
Apply Today
ADVERTISEMENT

More from Money:

A State-by-State Guide to Getting Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Benefits

Some Americans Are Getting Bonuses to Give Up Unemployment Benefits and Return to Work

Here Are Every State’s Unemployment Rules for Work Search and Waiting Periods

 

You May Like

EDIT POST