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By Jacob Davidson
August 25, 2014

A new study shows economists believe the Federal Reserve is doing the right thing by keeping interest rates low.

According to the August Economic Policy Survey, published semiannually by the National Association for Business Economics, 53% of the association’s 257 members said monetary policy was on the right track, while only 39% felt policy was too stimulative.

There has been concern from some quarters that the Fed’s consistently low rates are flooding the market with cheap credit, pushing up the cost of goods. Inflation already appears to have reached the Federal Reserve’s target of 2%, and some, like Guy LeBas, chief fixed-income strategist at Janney Montgomery Scott, think the central bank must act far in advance to prevent prices from rising too quickly.

The Fed has countered that employment and the real estate market must recover further—neither area is back to pre-recession levels—before upping interest rates becomes a viable option. Raising rates while the economy is still weak has the potential to stall GDP growth if businesses once again become reluctant invest money in jobs and capital. Money’s Taylor Tepper previously explained how Sweden’s premature interest rate hike has put the brakes on what was once Europe’s most encouraging economic comeback.

For now, at least, economists at the NABE seem to have taken the Federal Reserve’s side.

“Most panelists do not see inflation being a major concern in the coming years,” said Peter Evans, chair of the NABE Policy Survey Committee. “The majority of NABE panelists believe that inflation will be at or near 2% in 5 years.”

However, that support may not be permanent. Evans says the central bank’s approval rating inside NABE has edged downward since last year. All eyes remain on the Fed as it gradually winds down its quantitative easing program and watches the job market for signs of improvement. If inflation picks up, the bank may have to act—or risk a much less favorable approval rating from experts 12 months from now.

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