Many companies featured on Money advertise with us. Opinions are our own, but compensation and
in-depth research determine where and how companies may appear. Learn more about how we make money.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

By Alicia Adamczyk
February 21, 2016
Getty Images / Sandy Huffaker

Presidential hopeful Jeb Bush, the former Florida governor, suspended his campaign Saturday night after a crippling defeat in the South Carolina primary. It was a tough loss for the Republican, made all the more bitter when you consider how much money he raised and spent on his abandoned campaign.

As of January 31, Bush had raised more than $118 million through the Right to Rise Super PAC and about $32 million directly through his campaign. That’s the most of any candidate save Hillary Clinton, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. An additional $55,000 came from Millennials Rising, another conservative super PAC. (Perhaps now Bush will have more time to get his personal investments in order.)

According to the Huffington Post, the Right to Rise Super PAC has only about about $2.5 million left in its once-bulging coffers.

Much was made of Bush’s fundraising on Twitter after he announced his dropout.

Clinton has raised $163,672,986, most of that directly through her campaign. Ted Cruz follows with $89,637,194 raised, while Bernie Sanders has pulled in $75,068,120, putting him in fourth. Trump’s haul puts him behind both Ben Carson and Marco Rubio.

Here’s a tally of how much the other also-rans spent this election season according to the Center for Responsive Politics:

  1. Scott Walker: $24,436,318 from outside money, $7,973,750 from committee money = $32,410,068
  2. Chris Christie: $19,498,758 from outside money, $7,159,329 from committee money = $26,658,087
  3. Carly Fiorina: $13,015,651 from outside money, $11,349,057 from committee money = $24,364,708
  4. Rand Paul: $10,591,125 from outside money, $11,408,766 from committee money = $21,999,891
  5. Rick Perry: $15,231,068 from outside money, $1,427,133 from committee money = $16,658,201
  6. Lindsey Graham: $10,017,014 from outside money, $4,762,211 from committee money = $14,779,225
  7. Mike Huckabee: $5,714,126 from outside money, $3,950,146 from committee money = $9,664,272
  8. Bobby Jindal: $4,517,207 from outside money, $1,442,464 from committee money = $5,959,671
  9. Martin O’Malley: $1,105,138 from outside money, $4,791,834 from committee money = $5,896,972
  10. George Pataki:$1,547,674 from outside money, $544,183 from committee money = $2,091,857
  11. Rick Santorum: $639,151 from outside money, $1,302,885 from committee money = $1,942,036
  12. Jim Webb: $27,092 from outside money, $764,992 from committee money = $792,084
  13. Jim Gilmore: $305,172 from outside money, $214,440 from committee money = $519,612

Grand Total of Drop-Out Money Spent: $314,020,780

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

EDIT POST