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By Ethan Wolff-Mann
March 21, 2016
Joe Raedle—Getty Images

Taxes are extremely unpleasant to many people. They make every paycheck smaller, and once a year you fill out all that paperwork that you don’t really understand, hoping you don’t make a mistake that leads to a knock at the door by some men in black. (FYI: They don’t show up out of the blue; you usually get a ton of letters in the mail first.)

WalletHub decided to conduct a survey to see exactly how much people dislike the IRS. On the one hand, the results clearly show how “seriously” people consider online surveys. But they also reveal some deep-seated truths about the extent to which the American public loathes taxes.

Here are some highlights:

When asked what they would do in exchange for a future with no taxes, 27% of the survey respondents said they’d be willing to get an IRS tattoo. Another 11% would clean Chipotle toilets for three years, and 10% agreed to not talk for six months (easier for some than others). Meanwhile, 8% would name their first-born “Taxes” if the tradeoff was no taxes, 4% would kill someone if they didn’t get caught, and 4% would spend a year in prison. (Unfortunately, you’d probably spend a lot more time in jail than that if you refused to ever pay taxes.)

Interestingly, in another part of the survey, 86% said they believed the IRS is necessary, though 52% said much improvement was needed.

Survey respondents were also asked to name their “favorite” tax plan, which is apparently akin to picking one’s “favorite” painful dental procedure. A plurality (34%) said they didn’t have a favorite tax plan, while Bernie Sanders’s came in second with 26% over Donald Trump’s 12%.

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And when faced with the proposition of doing taxes versus some other unpleasant experiences, many chose the latter. More than one-third (35%) of respondents said they’d rather give a heinously awkward sex talk with their kids than do their taxes, and 23% said they’d rather miss a connecting flight. This essentially means that airports rate higher than taxes.

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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