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By Brad Tuttle
February 16, 2018
Lindsey Vonn of USA competes during the Audi FIS Alpine Ski World Cup Women's Downhill on February 4, 2018 in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.
Lindsey Vonn of USA competes during the Audi FIS Alpine Ski World Cup Women's Downhill on February 4, 2018 in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.
Hans Bezard/Agence Zoom—Getty Images

Superstar U.S. skier Lindsey Vonn is about to have a very busy week on the slopes at the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang.

Vonn, the winner of over 80 World Cup races, as well as the gold medal in the women’s downhill at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, is scheduled to compete in three alpine skiing events in the days to come.

Vonn is expected to race in the Women’s Super-G, Women’s Downhill, and Women’s Combined events at the 2018 PyeongChang Games, and the races stretch from Friday, February 16, to Friday, February 23.

Here’s the schedule for how to watch Lindsey Vonn compete in the Olympics, per NBCOlympics.com:

Friday, Feb. 16: Women’s Super-G Final, starting at 9 p.m. ET on NBC

Sunday, Feb. 18: Women’s Downhill Training, starting at 9 p.m. ET on NBCSN

Monday, Feb. 19: Women’s Downhill Training, starting at 9 p.m. ET on NBCSN

Tuesday, Feb. 20: Women’s Downhill Final, starting at 9 p.m. ET on NBC

Thursday, Feb. 22: Women’s Combined Run 1, starting at 9 p.m. ET on NBC

Friday, Feb. 23: Women’s Combined Run 2, starting at 12:30 a.m. ET on NBC

Bear in mind that all events are subject to change due to the weather. Wind has caused multiple alpine skiing events to be postponed at the 2018 Olympics. The delays have affected the race schedules for Mikaela Shiffrin and other Olympic skiers.

With the exception of the training sessions, which are airing on NBCSN, all you have to do watch Lindsey Vonn in the Olympics is tune into your local NBC station at the correct time. Most pay TV providers include free broadcast networks like NBC in basic packages. Even if you don’t have cable or satellite TV, you can still watch NBC for free with a digital antenna.

How to Stream Lindsey Vonn Compete in the Winter Olympics for Free

For streaming Lindsey Vonn in the Olympics on a laptop, phone, or other device, head to NBCOlympics.com or the NBC Sports app. NBC will allow you to live-stream the Olympics for a limited period, before prompting you to log in with a pay TV account number and password.

You may also be able to stream NBC with one of the many live-streaming TV services on the market. They include DirecTV Now, Hulu Live, Playstation Vue, Sling TV, and YouTube TV. Many of these services include local NBC channels and other networks in their streaming packages, but what’s included varies based on location and provider.

All of these services come with free trial periods for new signups, allowing you to check them out for a week or so without paying. Just remember to cancel before the trial period ends. If you don’t cancel in time, you’ll be charged in full—for $20 to $40, depending on the service—for the next month.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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