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By wordsthatecho
December 29, 2015

Stefanie O’Connell explains why you shouldn’t be afraid to negotiate the salary of your first job. Many employers are willing increase your starting salary by 5% to 10%, O’Connell explains, but most millennials tend to settle for the original salary offered.

She suggests three ways to kick off the negotiation process:

Do your homework. Find out how much others in your position are making.

Be your own advocate. It’s OK to boast about your abilities. A new employer has no way of knowing what you’re capable of unless you fill them in.

Offer a range. Go in prepared to ask for a salary range—but make the bottom of your range slightly above the employer’s initial offer. That way, O’Connell says, you set yourself up for a pay increase from the get-go.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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