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By wordsthatecho
December 2, 2016
401k money jar on desk of Caucasian businesswoman
401k money jar on desk of Caucasian businesswoman
JGI/Jamie Grill—Getty Images/Blend Images

For young adults just entering the workforce, it’s important to start thinking about saving for retirement early. Maria Bruno, a senior analyst at Vanguard, suggests that even if what you are setting aside is a small amount, it matters in the long run because of compound returns. Starting early and making sure that you have a diversified account that works for you and your lifestyle is the best way to ensure that you have a comfortable retirement.

It can be hard to save money for the future when more pressing money matters arise, like the need to pay down college debt or the costs associated with having a child. But if you start now, and start small, you can ease up on what you save later for retirement.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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