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By Donna Rosato
March 28, 2016

When personal finance journalist Jane Bryant Quinn was in her 20s, she didn’t think she could save for retirement because she was living paycheck-to-paycheck. Then Jane, author of How to Make Your Money Last: The Indispensable Retirement Guide, got some good advice from a colleague, who told her to just start saving. So she had money automatically deducted from her paycheck and deposited into her company’s retirement savings plan. She was still living paycheck-to-paycheck, but she was saving for retirement, too. She didn’t miss the money. And that leads her to the best financial advice she would give someone today.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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