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By Allana Akhtar
March 23, 2018
Airline passengers eat in a terminal cafe as a United Airlines passenger plane is parked at a gate at Denver International Airport in Denver, Colorado.
Airline passengers eat in a terminal cafe as a United Airlines passenger plane is parked at a gate at Denver International Airport in Denver, Colorado.
Robert Alexander—Getty Images

Nothing is more frustrating than getting bumped off a flight—but a massive travel voucher may ease the pain.

United Airlines gave passenger Allison Preiss a $10,000 travel credit after removing her from an overbooked flight on Thursday, representatives confirmed to Money. United couldn’t board her because a seat broke on the plane, according to Preiss, and no one volunteered to give up a seat. Preiss said the airline chose to remove her because she paid the lowest fare.

Washington Dulles International gate agents originally offered her $1,000 in travel credits, but bumped her voucher up to $10,000 when she asked for cash, Priess told NBC. Money reached out to Preiss for additional comment.

Preiss may not be the only recipient of a lofty travel voucher from United. The airline changed its policy last year to allow customers up to $10,000 in travel vouchers if they volunteer to give up their seat on an overbooked flight. The policy change came after a video of airline officials dragging a passenger off a plane circulated on social media.

Despite her hefty compensation, Preiss’ circumstance is not unusual. When a passenger is bumped, airlines are by law required to rebook and compensate passengers who involuntarily give up their seat. The company must also offer a check if the passenger does not want a travel voucher.

United is the second-most likely airline to bump passengers for overbooked flights, according to data from MileCards.com.

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

EDIT POST