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Verizon signage and logo on its building at 375 pearl street, New York city.
Verizon signage and logo on its building at 375 pearl street, New York city.
Roberto Machado Noa—LightRocket via Getty Images

Verizon Communications said an attacker had exploited a security vulnerability on its enterprise client portal to steal contact information of a number of customers.

The company said the attacker however did not gain access to Customer Proprietary Network Information (CPNI) or other data.

CPNI is the information that telephone companies collect including the time, date, duration and destination number of each call and the type of network a consumer subscribes to.

Krebs On Security, which first broke the news of the breach, said a member of a underground cybercrime forum had posted a new thread advertising the sale of a database containing the contact information on some 1.5 million customers of Verizon Enterprise.

The seller priced the entire package at $100,000, but offered to sell it off in parts of 100,000 records for $10,000 apiece, Krebs added.

The vulnerability, which was investigated and fixed, did not leak any data on consumer customers, Verizon said in a statement on Thursday.

The company is currently notifying customers impacted by the breach.

Read next: What Should I Do If I Have Been a Victim of a Data Breach?

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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