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By Kerri Anne Renzulli
March 16, 2015
Anatolii Babii—Alamy

If you use Yahoo, you can quit trying to remember your password or having to change it every time a company you do business with is hacked.

The tech company on Sunday announced that it is now offering “on-demand” email passwords that will be sent to you via your cellphone.

The process is similar to “two-step verification” security models already used by other businesses, which requires you to enter a fixed password first, followed by another code sent to you by the company via text message. Yahoo’s system skips that whole first step.

At its unveiling Sunday at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, company vice president Dylan Casey called this “the first step to eliminating passwords,” and said he doesn’t think the industry “has done a good enough job of putting ourselves in the shoes of the people using our products,” according to a report by the Guardian.

The company also released a blog post detailing exactly how to sign up for the optional service, which is currently available only in the United States.

Learn more about why to set up two-factor authentication and how to protect your online money accounts here. And until you do, use this handy chart to create a harder-to-crack password that you can still remember.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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