By Donna Rosato
April 27, 2015

Q: I want to remain in my current home when I retire. What can I do to make sure it is a place where I can age well?

A: If your home is where your heart is, then you have lots of company: Three-quarters of people 45 and up surveyed by AARP say they’ll remain in their current residences as long as they can.

Adapting your home to accommodate your needs as you age takes work, however. So the earlier you start, the better. Do it now, while you have the income and energy to tackle the project, advises Amy Levner, manager of AARP’s Livable Communities initiative. Here’s your plan of action:

Start with the easy fixes. Many of the upgrades that make it easier to stay in your home as you get older—such as raising electrical outlets to make them more accessible, installing better outdoor lighting, and trading in turning doorknobs for lever handles—aren’t expensive. “And these small changes can make a big difference,” says Levner. Check out AARP’s room-by-room guide at aarp.org/livable-communities for more suggestions of what to fix.

Assess the bigger jobs. To make your house livable for the long, long run, consider investing in some more extensive renovations. These include things like bringing the master suite and laundry room to the first floor to avoid stairs, adding a step-in shower, and covering entranceways to prevent falls. Such jobs can be costly (see chart below), so get a bid from a contractor—then determine if it’s worth that price to you to stay or whether you’ll just move later if need be. The good news is that changes you make for aging in place can also make the home more appealing to future buyers, says Linda Broadbent, a real estate agent in Charlottesville, Va.

Notes: Prices for grab bars, door handles, and lights are per unit. Sources: AARP, National Association of Home Builders, AgeInPlace.org, Remodeling magazine

Budget for outsourcing. No getting around the upkeep a house requires. Sure, when you’re retired, you’ll have more time to mow the lawn and paint the fence. But don’t forget that you may be away from home for periods traveling or visiting the grandkids. And later on, you probably don’t want the physical drudgery of home maintenance. Research the fees to hire out some of the tougher tasks such as snow removal and yard work, and build those costs into your retirement income needs.

Deepen community connections. Your close-by social network is just as important as the house itself. “Living in a place where people know you and can help you or provide social interaction will give you a better quality of life,” says Emily Saltz, CEO of geriatriccare-management service provider Life Care Advocates. Use these pre-retirement years to strengthen local ties—explore volunteer opportunities, check out classes, and get to know your neighbors.

Maintaining a social circle is especially important if your kids live far away or have demanding jobs. Good friends will shuttle you to doctors’ appointments and hold the ladder while you change the fire-detector battery, as well as help you up your tennis game.

 

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