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By Ethan Wolff-Mann
January 11, 2016
Harrer, Andrew—Bloomberg/Getty Images

After half a decade of data caps for everyone but a lucky few with grandfathered all-you-can-surf plans, AT&T is bringing unlimited data back.

Unfortunately, there’s a few big, fat strings attached: You have to have a DirecTV and U-Verse subscription from the telecom company as well. To help attract and keep more subscribers from cord cutting and fleeing to Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime, AT&T will give you unlimited data, phone, and text for $100 per month if you have or add the service. Additional devices are $40 per phone and tablet. Subscribers will also get a $10 discount on the TV service.

The rationale behind resuscitating unlimited data is to bring the TV service to mobile devices, giving them viewing access anywhere there is 4G LTE connectivity.

AT&T suggests that this is a limited-time offer (“may be available for a limited time”), but it’s not clear how long it’ll be available.

While unlimited data hasn’t died completely with thanks to the grandfathered plans on Verizon and AT&T—as well as smaller providers like T-Mobile and Sprint—they often will restrict bandwidth if you use over 23 GB. AT&T’s fine print indicates it’ll do this after 22 GB.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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