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By Jennifer Calfas
May 28, 2017
An employee of Ben & Jerry's scoops ice cream into a cone outside Union Station in Washington on June 18, 2013.
An employee of Ben & Jerry's scoops ice cream into a cone outside Union Station in Washington on June 18, 2013.
SAUL LOEB—AFP/Getty Images

Ben & Jerry’s is using its ice cream for social change yet again.

In an effort to promote the legalization of same-sex marriage in Australia, Ben & Jerry’s has banned its scoop shops there from selling same-flavor double scoops — saying “love comes in all flavors.”

“Imagine heading down to your local Scoop Shop to order your favorite two scoops of Cookie Dough in a waffle cone,” Ben & Jerry’s wrote in a statement last week. “But you find out you are not allowed – Ben & Jerry’s has banned two scoops of the same flavor.”

“But this doesn’t even begin to compare to how furious you would be if you were told you were not allowed to marry the person you love,” the company continued. “So we are banning two scoops of the same flavor and encouraging our fans to contact their MPs to tell them that the time has come – make marriage equality legal!”

The Vermont-based ice cream shop has 26 locations in Australia, and the company encouraged customers to stop in at one of the stores to write postcards to their members of Parliament in favor of same-sex marriage legalization.

About two-thirds of Australians support the legalization of same-sex marriage. Legislation to hold a plebiscite on same-sex marriage did not pass Parliament last year as more politicians supported a more conclusive vote on the issue. Like same-sex marriage advocates in Australia, Ben & Jerry’s came out against a plebiscite and in favor of a free vote.

“But after a 14-month debate, the Senate saw it for what it was – an expensive and unnecessary exercise that could endanger the LGBTQI community and wouldn’t even guarantee marriage equality,” Ben & Jerry’s said.

The final gathering of Parliament is June 13, Ben & Jerry’s notes in its statement.

Ben & Jerry’s is no stranger to politics. The ice-cream brand has consistently voiced support for a number of issues, including the legalization of same-sex marriage, efforts to combat climate change and advocating for the ethical treatment of animals.

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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