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By Kaitlin Mulhere
November 4, 2016
A rare instance of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker eating something other than a ham-and-cheese sandwich, while campaigning in 2015.
A rare instance of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker eating something other than a ham-and-cheese sandwich, while campaigning in 2015.
Scott Olson—Getty Images

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker tried to show the Twitter-verse Friday that he’s a simple ham-and-cheese-loving kind of guy.

Walker tweeted that for 26 long years in a row, he has eaten not one, but two ham-and-cheese sandwiches almost everyday for lunch. “Like millions of Americans, I bring my own lunch to work,” Walker wrote in the tweet.

His Friday announcement followed a picture he shared on Thursday of a rather sad-looking ham-and-cheese sandwich to celebrate #NationalSandwichDay.

Twitter users, naturally, had a lot to say about Walker’s eating habits, especially his uninspired sandwich of choice.

Jokes (and the oddity and mind-numbing boredom of eating the same thing everyday) aside, Walker’s right that he’s not alone in brown-bagging it. In fact, Americans are packing their lunch even more this year in response to higher restaurant prices. Lunch traffic at restaurants was down 4% during the second quarter of 2016, and the average customer bill was down 5%.

So perhaps Walker has just been ahead of his time–by more than a quarter-century–in terms of this whole brown-bagging lunch thing.

Read Next: Americans Aren’t Going Out to Lunch As Much

Bringing your lunch from home even a few days a week can be a big money saver too. People who buy lunch every work day burn through about $2,500 a year, according to What Are You Doing for Lunch, by Mona Meighan. Calculations done by Money columnist Dan Kadlec show that if you skip the $15 daily lunch in favor of brown-bagging a meal that cost you $3 to make, you’ll save $31,000 over the next 10 years. (However, Walker, who has a history of being in credit card debt, apparently needs to do more than brown-bag his lunch to pay off his bills.)

In sum, Walker reminded us of two important lessons today: Eating out for lunch can be a huge money suck, and people are going to roll their eyes when you share pointless life stories on social media. That goes whether you’re well-known politician or a regular guy.

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Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

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