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By Ethan Wolff-Mann
May 9, 2016
Keane, Chris—Bloomberg/Getty Images

Bank of America’s spring Small Business Owner Report is out, and it has a few interesting bits — for example, only 15% vote purely based on their perspective as a small business owner.

Among the various takeaways from the survey was some insight into how small business owners hire people. The first major takeaway from the study was that education may not be considered as critical a filter on resumes. Asked to evaluate the most important hiring criteria, employers chose skill level by a huge margin, at 49%. Behind were fit with company culture at 24%, work experience at 24%, and education in last with just 3%.

Besides tending to favor skill over any other quality, small business owners overwhelmingly preferred Gen-X employees over other generations. While Baby Boomers were fairly unloved at 8%, Gen-X employees were preferred by 47% of employees, a factor of almost 6X. Millennials were in the middle, preferred by 26% of small business owners.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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