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By moneyeditor
October 10, 2016
Republican nominee Donald Trump (L) faces off against Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton
Republican nominee Donald Trump (L) faces off against Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton
Getty Images (2)

At the second 2016 presidential debate, held Sunday night at Washington University in St. Louis, Republican candidate Donald Trump and Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton sparred over health care, taxes, jobs, and the economy.

Both candidates agreed that the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, has problems that need to be remedied. Clinton talked about how much Obamacare has helped Americans, and why it’s so important to keep it going. Trump, who called Obamacare “a disaster,” talked about how he would get rid of it altogether.

Both candidates said they would boost taxes on wealthy investors who benefit from current tax policy. While Trump said that he would lower taxes on the middle class and Clinton would raise them, Clinton poked fun at the idea of Trump, who may not have paid federal income taxes over 20 years, talking about fixing the system.

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The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

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