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By Amarilis Yera
Updated: April 27, 2021 11:00 AM ET | Originally published: January 26, 2021
Best Inflatable Hot Tub
Intex

PureSpa Greywood Deluxe

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As of 07/29/2021

Bottom Line

The Intex PureSpa combines the affordability and portability of inflatable hot tubs with more jet power and a dual filtration system.

Pros

Comes with carrying bag, two inflatable headrests, multi-colored LED light.

Cons

Some users say it’s not big enough to fit 6 people as advertised.

Editor's Pick
Coleman

SaluSpa Inflatable Hot Tub Spa

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As of 07/29/2021

Bottom Line

Packed with 114 jets, the SaluSpa is perfect for reaping the relaxation benefits of a hot tub without breaking the bank.

Pros

Fully portable, setup takes under 30 minutes.

Cons

Not capable of running the heater and jets simultaneously.

Best Hot Tub Overall
Lifesmart

LS600DX 7- Person 65-Jet 230v Spa

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As of 07/29/2021

Bottom Line

A hot tub that will be the highlight of any backyard, with space for seven, plus 65 fully adjustable water jets, underwater lights, and a waterfall.

Pros

14 turbo blasters, as well as 4-foot jets for targeted massage.

Cons

Requires installation by a certified electrician.

Best for Small Spaces
AquaRest Spas

Premium 300

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As of 07/29/2021

Bottom Line

This 2-person hot tub features 20 hydrotherapy jets and seats with lumbar support, and it's small enough to squeeze into most backyards or decks.

Pros

A "plug-and-play" tub, it works right out of the box.

Cons

Pro installation required to run the heater and jets simultaneously.

Best Value
AquaRest Spas

Graystone Premium 400

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As of 07/29/2021

Bottom Line

Designed to fit four people, this hot tub can operate when connected to a standard plug, with massaging jets and a backlit waterfall.

Pros

Price under $3,000 when on sale, adjustable jets for deeper massage.

Cons

Some users complain seats are a bit tight for four people.

Bottom Line

The Intex PureSpa combines the affordability and portability of inflatable hot tubs with more jet power and a dual filtration system.

Packed with 114 jets, the SaluSpa is perfect for reaping the relaxation benefits of a hot tub without breaking the bank.

A hot tub that will be the highlight of any backyard, with space for seven, plus 65 fully adjustable water jets, underwater lights, and a waterfall.

This 2-person hot tub features 20 hydrotherapy jets and seats with lumbar support, and it's small enough to squeeze into most backyards or decks.

Designed to fit four people, this hot tub can operate when connected to a standard plug, with massaging jets and a backlit waterfall.

Pros

Comes with carrying bag, two inflatable headrests, multi-colored LED light.

Fully portable, setup takes under 30 minutes.

14 turbo blasters, as well as 4-foot jets for targeted massage.

A "plug-and-play" tub, it works right out of the box.

Price under $3,000 when on sale, adjustable jets for deeper massage.

Cons

Some users say it’s not big enough to fit 6 people as advertised.

Not capable of running the heater and jets simultaneously.

Requires installation by a certified electrician.

Pro installation required to run the heater and jets simultaneously.

Some users complain seats are a bit tight for four people.

There’s something undeniably satisfying about taking a dip in a hot tub. Soaking in the warm water for a few minutes can help you relax after a long stressful day. It can even provide some pain-relief benefits as the heat and massaging action of the jets help reduce inflammation and ease sore muscles.

Traditional hot tubs are fairly expensive — easily $2,000, and possibly much more. But nowadays there are several lower priced options that are just as capable of providing spa-style luxury and relaxation.

Inflatable hot tubs cost a fraction of traditional hard shell tubs. For as little as $500, you can buy an inflatable hot tub that fits up to six and has bubble jets and built-in water filtration systems, among other traditional tub features. Better yet, they’re ready to use out of the box, with no need for a professional installation. Just inflate them, plug them into any wall socket around your house, and enjoy. They’re also portable and can be deflated and stored out of the way when not in use.

Still, hard shell hot tubs are often the better choice for homeowners. They’re more durable, comfortable, longer-lasting, and energy-efficient compared to inflatable models. Since they require an independent power panel, traditional hot tubs can handle extras like underwater lights, for example. Most importantly, the intensity of the jets can be adjusted for a deeper massage, effective at loosening tight muscles.

Between purchase and installation costs, a traditional acrylic or plastic hot tub can cost more than $5,000. Yet it may be worth it in the long run, especially if you use your hot tub frequently and take advantage of all the extra features.

Hot tub buying guide

Here are a few factors to consider before deciding which type of hot tub to purchase:

• Inflatable or hard shell. Retailing for around $400 to $1,000, inflatable hot tubs can reach a temperature of 104°F just like traditional hard shell models. They also come equipped with digital pumps that can control around 100 bubble jets, a built-in water filtration system, and inflate the tub in as little as 15 minutes. These tubs are completely portable and require no tools or professional installation.

However, inflatable models are generally not as powerful. Their jets produce bubbles that are sufficient for a relaxing soak, but don’t provide the benefits of hydrotherapy jets, which can target problem areas in the back and/or feet. And inflatable hot tubs take significantly longer to reach the maximum 104°F temperature — sometimes up to 24 hours, depending on the climate in your area.

This doesn’t necessarily mean inflatable models consume more energy. In fact, they technically consume less since they connect to standard 120v plugs and their heaters and pump require less power. The heater and pump on a 120v tub may consume around 3,000 watts. A traditional tub needs a 240v connection and may consume more than 5,000 watts.

But that doesn’t fully explain how much energy your hot tub will use (or how high your energy bill will be). A traditional tub may require more power but can be more energy efficient since it is better insulated. Hard tubs have both an insulated locking cover as well as insulation along their walls. This allows them to trap heat more efficiently and thus reduce the energy consumption.

• Voltage. For the most part, hard shell hot tubs use 220v-240v outlets, while inflatable models generally use 110-120v.

Hot tubs operating on 220v-240v can run several pumps and the heater simultaneously. They can also support high-powered massage jets and extra add-ons like lighting systems and built-in waterfalls.

Although powerful, these models do have some downsides. Not only do they cost thousands of dollars, they also require the cost of professional installation.

Inflatable tubs running on 110v-120v, on the other hand, are known as plug-and-play tubs since all you have to do is plug them in any standard home socket and you’re good to go. However, inflatable hot tubs take longer to heat up and may have weaker jets that can’t run at the same time as the heating system. So, if you turn on the jets, the water will eventually become cooler.

• Built-in features. Typically, budget hot tubs only come with a few simple features such as bubble jets and an insulation cover. If you’re looking to have a warm soak once in a while, this should be sufficient.

If you’re interested in the full spa experience, you’ll have to pay extra. High-end tubs can feature molded seats with lumbar support, multiple jet types, a multi-colored light system, a waterfall, and even sound systems.

Best hot tubs

1. Best inflatable hot tub: Intex PureSpa Greywood Deluxe

Courtesy of Amazon

Courtesy of AmazonThe Intex PureSpa Greywood Deluxe is ideal for anyone who wants an affordable inflatable hot tub that comes with a few bells and whistles found on more expensive models.

This tub can hold up to six people and heat water up to 104°F, like many other inflatables. However, the PureSpa has 170 bubble jets — around 50 more than cheaper models. More bubbles can provide some added stress relief. It also features a hard water treatment system to reduce calcium buildups and a floating chlorine dispenser that can keep the water clean longer.

Like other inflatable models, the PureSpa features an easy-to-use panel that controls the temperature, timer, bubble jets, and filtration system altogether. The panel is wireless for added convenience, and it can be charged directly on the tub by placing it on a built-in holding slot.

The PureSpa is fully portable and even comes with a carrying bag. Among the other extras are two inflatable headrests and a multi-colored LED light.

2. Editor’s pick: Coleman SaluSpa Inflatable Hot Tub Spa

Courtesy of Amazon

Coleman is popular for its quality yet affordable outdoor gear, and the SaluSpa is a great representative of the brand.

For a little over $500, this inflatable hot tub offers a solid three-layer design and a quick setup. The SaluSpa comes with a digital pump that controls the inflation, temperature, and filtration. Press one button, and the tub inflates automatically, reaching full capacity in about 20 minutes.

Depending on the weather conditions and where the hot tub is placed, the pump can heat the water up to 104°F in as little as five hours. Note that if you live in a colder place, it could take up to a day. There’s an integrated start/stop timer you can set to schedule a specific time for the tub to be ready for use.

The pump runs 114 air jets along the bottom of the tub to produce a decent amount of bubbles. Keep in mind, however, that the heater and bubble system can’t operate at the same time. So, if the air jets are on, the water temperature will start to decrease.

However, some reviewers have mentioned that the water temperature stays at 104°F for quite some time when the air jets are on, even in winter.

The SaluSpa is completely portable. It can fit up to six people and has cushioned walls and floor. The walls are also puncture-resistant, UV-resistant, and solid enough for bathers to lean on or sit on while climbing in and out.

3. Best hot tub overall: LS600DX by Lifesmart Spas

Courtesy of The Home Depot

If you’re looking for a complete spa-like experience and are not limited by a tight budget, consider the LS600DX by Lifesmart Spas. The list price is usually $6,500, but it is sometimes on sale for around $4,000.

The LS600DX seats up to seven people and has 65 jets, including 14 turbo blasters and 4 foot jets for localized massage action. It has a 3 hp pump (compared to 2 hp for lower-priced models) that, when combined with the air-control valve, offers greater control over the jet’s intensity. You can go from relaxing bubbles to full blast back or foot massage using the digital control panel. The tub includes a waterfall and underwater LED color-changing lights too.

This is a 230v hot tub, giving it sufficient power to heat up quickly. It contains full foam insulation, as well as an insulated locking cover to help maintain water temperature and save energy. According to Lifesmart, this model meets all the energy guidelines set for by the California Energy Commission (CEC).

4. Best hot tub for small spaces: Premium 300 from AquaRest Spas

Courtesy of Wayfair

The Premium 300 from AquaRest Spas is designed for two people, making it suitable for small decks or backyards. Yet the tub’s tiny size doesn’t mean it’s bare bones.

This hot tub has 20 hydrotherapy jets, which can be adjusted to provide a gentle or deep massage. The jets are placed strategically to target back pain, and the seats also have a lumbar arch to provide additional support. To create a more soothing atmosphere, the Premium 300 features a small waterfall with a multi-color LED backlight.

The Premium 300 is a plug-and-play (120v) hot tub that requires no professional installation. However, when connected with the standard 120v plug, the hot tub will take longer to heat up, and it’s not possible to run the heater and the jets at the same time. This model can be converted to a 240v connection by a certified electrician, though.

The Premium 300 has a dual filtration system, which can filter water and reduce the need for chlorine by around 50% to 75%.

The retail price for the Premium 300 is $3,500 but it can sometimes be found online for around less than $3,000. If you’re not interested in the dual water filtration system or upgrading the power supply to 240v, you can go for the Select 300, which costs a few hundred dollars less.

5. Best for low prices: Graystone Premium 400 from AquaRest Spas

Courtesy of Wayfair

If the Premium 300 from AquaRest Spas is too small, check out the four-person Premium 400.

The Premium 400 has a polyethylene shell that is resistant to stains, cold temperatures, and UV rays. It’s also impact resistant, making it an ideal choice for an outdoors area where children play. And it’s as relaxing as it is sturdy: The lumbar arch and 20 hydrotherapy jets in each seat target sore back muscles, while the multi-color backlit waterfall creates a spa-ish ambience.

Although it’s a bigger model than the Premium 300, the Premium 400 is also a plug-and-play (120v) hot tub. It doesn’t require any professional installation, unless you want to upgrade to 240v for more power.

This model’s filtration system reduces the need for chlorine by around 50% to 75%. Pair that with the tub’s insulated walls and the sealing cover, and you’ve got a water- and energy-efficient tub ideal for an average-sized household.

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