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By Rob Wile
March 28, 2017
Photo Illustration by Tiffany Herring for Money, Getty Images (3)

Bill Gates, Tim Cook, Elon Musk, and other business titans are set to join the new “SWAT team” being put together by Donald Trump son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner to reform U.S. government bureaucracy, the Washington Post reports.

The new White House Office of American Innovation, the formal name for the group, is being touted as a “nonideological ideas factory,” the Post says. It is targeting “stagnation” that “has hindered [the government’s] ability to properly function, often creating widespread congestion and leading to cost overruns and delays,” President Trump said in a statement.

“The government should be run like a great American company,” Kushner said. “Our hope is that we can achieve successes and efficiencies for our customers, who are the citizens.”

Also being tapped to serve as advisers to the office are Salesforce chief executive Marc Benioff and Stephen A. Schwarzman, chief executive of the investment firm Blackstone Group.

“There is a need to figure out what policies are adding friction to the system without accompanying it with significant benefits,” Shwarzman said. “It’s easy for the private sector to at least see where the friction is, and to do that very quickly and succinctly.”

The group is separate from the White House’s business advisory council, which includes other magnates like the CEOs of General Motors, JPMorgan, and Walmart. It will also work to solve problems outside of government, like providing broadband Internet service to every American, the Post reported.

Advertiser Disclosure

The purpose of this disclosure is to explain how we make money without charging you for our content.

Our mission is to help people at any stage of life make smart financial decisions through research, reporting, reviews, recommendations, and tools.

Earning your trust is essential to our success, and we believe transparency is critical to creating that trust. To that end, you should know that many or all of the companies featured here are partners who advertise with us.

Our content is free because our partners pay us a referral fee if you click on links or call any of the phone numbers on our site. If you choose to interact with the content on our site, we will likely receive compensation. If you don't, we will not be compensated. Ultimately the choice is yours.

Opinions are our own and our editors and staff writers are instructed to maintain editorial integrity, but compensation along with in-depth research will determine where, how, and in what order they appear on the page.

To find out more about our editorial process and how we make money, click here.

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